Getting Loans on Your Jewelry

Our Jewelry Loan Program allows clients who have short term cash needs to use their jewelry as collateral on a low interest cash loan. Our loan clients generally cherish and value their jewelry and gold to such an extent that they do not want to sell and say goodbye to it. Under the Jewelry Loan Program, as long as the loan and interest is paid back clients retain ownership of their jewelry; yet also cover their immediate cash needs.

To better understand what items we buy and how we go about appraising your Jewelry, please visit our We Deal With.. page for more information.

Likewise, you can visit our Selling your Jewelry page to understand how to quickly sell your unused, unwanted valuables for immediate cash.

Using your jewelry and valuables as collateral for a cash loan is one of oldest methods of doing business. In fact, most people who own their homes have used their home as collateral for a loan. This is known as a home mortgage. There was a time when large banks provided loans to the public using their jewelry and valuables as collateral; however, they stopped doing this because they did not have enough expertise in understanding the value of the items they were collecting as collateral. Therefore, fine establishments like Lombard Mutual have taken the banks’ place as a trusted business partner for those people looking to borrow cash against their jewelry.

What Do We Mean…

As noted above, Lombard Mutual was created and modeled after a fine banking institution, specializing in jewelry and valuables. Our commitments to customer service and providing value for our clients our unrivaled. However, as you may know, the typical pawnshop has retained a foul smelling reputation over the years. Check out this video from a great 1983 movie.

 

At Lombard, we have, and always will be, committed to dispelling these negative opinions of and associations with pawnshops. When you come in or call us, you will see how we are truly modeled after a fine banking facility for jewelry loans, rather than a “downtown Philadelphia pawnshop” as depicted in the movie.